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that when we have written about laura's law that some of the post poignant arguments from family members that they have done everything they can do but don't know how to help a loved one. what would you have done? could force treatment made a difference? >> yes. absolutely. laura's law is not forced treatment. i don't know why mr. vega keeps using that word because laura's law is an upfront tool before somebody needs crisis. if they are proven to be a danger to themselves or someone else, a judge tries to get a treatment team and they try to talk with this person and figure out a way for them to stay out of the hospital. we have forced treatment, we have 51/50. my son has been through 51/50 numerous times. he's been slammed with this. this is a horrible experience. laura's law is a tool, only a tool that may help. for whoever can help, and thank god they don't to have go through the other part. i would say the same thing as this officer said is that some people can't help themselves. the not civil to sit here and watch people lose their lives. i can tell you that. i have been in group
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
there are different needs in different communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is accep
reach out to the local bar. law firms like jim's law firm or chris's law firm help us in situations where we are trying to establish counsel and reinforce. we get over a thousand cases a year. from that first request we are usually able to take it down to about half. many of them who are writing to us are not claiming to be innocent. they are probably claiming that their prison conditions are inadequate and they are probably right. they might be claiming that they haven't received their medication, they are probably right. they are probably -- they often complaining that they were overcharged and over sentence. they probably right. we refer them as much as we can to those that might be able to help them. from then we begin the triage process to see if there is any kind of assistance once we investigate and if we are able to litigate it. >> thank you. next i would like to ask jim, poor people who are accused of a crime have a right to a public defender but most of the cases are in civil court, child custody, workers right, compensation for catastrophic injuries. where is the combid
. knows nothing about the hear say rule, nothing about the law. she wonders the halls like their dead. i have seen it. it's out there and it's not right. it's unacceptable. when the hearing is over, she's denied all connection to her daughter. that is what we are talking about. >> what do you think it's going to take to make society in government to take the step towards gideon and it's what we've talked about. you have worked on this for many years? >> and the bar association that is represented today. i think we are proud of our city, whatever city might be here today. we are all proud of our city. i like this city because we get ideas here that nobody else gets. some of them are really bad. we are all friends here. right? so, our little committee, we are powerless in this culture. forget about it. we have no cloud. so our slogan is, we don't think, we do. because we don't want to study things. there are people out there studying things. so we want to a supervisor. david chu, in this city, we said here is the problem and he said that is terrible. he's a practicing lawyer and we went f
moving forward and i have had many conversations with superintendents and law enforcement officials as well about how we can address this data integrity issue and how a school won't be hoisted by their own petard because they had the courage to collect the data when other schools kind of look the other way. so, again, it's a hard question to answer in ways that are other than anecdote. there have been survey data and things of that nature, but i feel uncomfortable saying unequivocally this is what we know, these are the trends. i like to be evidence based and i'm not sure the evidence allows that. >> roslyn, challenges to you and secretary duncan. >> for the first time you can see data for the first time about the -- discipline and students referred to law enforcement, suspensions more than once. on the bullying and harassment we are also collecting for the first time ever data on the number of incidents of students disciplined for bullying and harassment. they are not exactly reliable. lots of folks aren't collecting this. our collection is at the school level so you could go
or particularly polarizing issues, but because i believe in it. i believe that laura's law outpatient treatment is a tool among many tools that we have in the mental health system to try to engage people in a recovery based way. the foundation of laura's law is a multidisciplinary team trying to engage people, trying to give them as much say in the treatment plan as they are willing to provide and when you read the description in nevada county that has it fully implemented. when you meet the people who work they are, they believe in the same things that mr. vega was mentioning, love kindness, i think that's why we all do this work but there are individuals like my mother, maybe like his son who need a little bit of extra help. i think that sometimes oftentimes clients see judges differently than they see their doctors. they are more line listening to judges than their doctors and than can be a very effective push into treatment, and that sometimes not pushing them in that way prevents them from getting into treatment in the beginning. what i found is that that is the first step to recovery. onc
some restrictions, but you guys are fantastic at bringing in laws. so, maybe you can create some kind of law. you're so good at that. you would be the country to start that, i would be quite certain. we have to go about 10 steps through parliament and it takes 20 years to change a law. i think you can do it overnight. [laughter] >> well, maybe. thank you. (applause) >> we have another answer. >> if i might very quickly. >> yes, of course. >> i have worked with aerosol with youth on murals as well as individual projects. i've also done collage. we've done paint pens. we have used a number of different things from silk screen t-shirts to making logos. my experience with these youth is you might engage them through graffiti. you don't have to use arrow zoll. it's expensive. it's anywhere from 8 to $14 a can wherever you get it. and you also have to then worry about protecting the eyes, the hands and the proper respirator which could be 35 to $50 apiece per youth. so, to me it's a really expensive way to engage that graffiti side of the artistic or creative behavior. at the same time, mon
this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might reflect on them. it's crazy but that's part of the oppression. when we started to work on the legislation, i tried to channel myself back in the classroom, i taught for a number of years. we're hoping seth's law is the first of many. in addition to their reporting you also have to document, we feel like this is the science of it which, you know, sounds a little sterile when you consider the emotional loss, but that you document each incident as it happens so you have a record and you also look at the climate, the culture, and also the perpetr
about treatment and in your chronicle about laura's law that you think the need to help the vast majority of people who do want treatments. but aren't there cases as we are hearing today that force treatment is necessary? >> well, so i have been working in mental health field for about 22 years various places across the country. i have worked in crisis programs here and in new york city and pretty much ever phase of program there is. i have been a suicide prevention interventionist, i guess after this, the one thing i want to say that force is not treatment. one thing that we have learned in the community mental health system which was set up in the 60s partly to answer the need for social justice around mental health is that people respond to dignity and fair treatment. and the -- as an example of the -- i think that the psych so physiology is that it's still very coneject ral. that doesn't really matter. the one thing that i have realized in working with people in all sorts of states, regardless of what you call their state, they respond to, if you treat them with love, with k
is that the by law is not specific to graffiti. so, graffiti is not defined. it doesn't say that it slashes or it doesn't describe it in that nature. and it doesn't speak to permission either. the by law is written such that it's under community standards 14600 with respect to community standards and buildings that are considered a nuisance. there's a specific statement in there, i don't have it in front of me unfortunately, with respect to graffiti. and, so, i guess the question, then, -- question is, do we ever have trouble with property owners saying, well, i want to have this piece of graffiti on our property and i don't feel it's a nuisance and i'm not going to remove it? and we haven't had any problems actually whatsoever with our graffiti by law being challenged. how the by law works is that our by law officers, any graffiti that comes up is at their discretion. so, whether they determine what is on the property is a nuisance and it allows us to keep our mural programs running. it allows us to look at individual situations. early on we had one situation where there was a property own
decide d in gideon's favor. this system which he fought for so long in the justice. the decision was law of the land. equal justice under law. >> when a supreme court decided the gideon case, they really brought light to that phrase. it doesn't matter if you are rich, it doesn't matter if you are poor, you get the same equal chance. >> just look at what happened to gideon. the supreme court didn't set gideon free but it gave him a fair trial with a competent attorney. >> not guilty. >> clarence earl gideon was a free man. the man who won a landmark supreme court case went to live a normal living with a job pumping gas. >> when i read where it says equal justice under law, i'm very inspired by that. i'm very comforted by that. but i know a lot of people are treated unfairly. i see it as something encouraging but i don't see it yet. >> it's written into constitution and established into the goal for society to reach for and live up to. people will fall short, rights can be ignored or even trampled. with nothing more than a pencil and knowledge. >> if you know your rights you can protect
this year it is a place and space of despair and lack of hope. i have tremendous respect for our law enforce .. we have been doing restorative justice work with the police department and with the teachers. people are saying enough is enough and i have in fact have to change to seek transformation. i mean we have to -- the saying cornell west that justice is the public face of love. if in fact we want that to be true we have to be just with one another and i think that's what we're trying to do in oakland. [applause] >> district attorney. >> well first of all i would like to thank you for putting this together. i also want to thank katie miller and rebecca from my office and consistently at the forefront and in the community and common sense media who became a partner last year and katie and her people and rebecca and the school district we started public information a year ago and my partner richard carranza who is an incredible superintendent, someone i am proud to work with. first of all let me tell you that bullying takes many different shapes. it can be physical, it can be
and the city can inspect before he can give us estimate. this any work in the state law, you have to have state certify anything regarding lead paint. we have the right to ask them to comply with that law. i have maintained my position. you can see the letter i spelled out in september. i would grant the permission for your worker to enter the property only workers that is properly certified and liability insurance. this is my legal right to have that information. he has refused. instead he spent the time and effort to provide those things. he has provide nothing. and now he is not -- you have to be personally certified to do the work. we just ask who is the person to do this work has certification. i have not received a single document. all the time is attacked me personally. he's filed a lawsuit in the court and acquired title. the court already ruled. they don't have an easement. he's responsible for preventing the project from moving forward. we already said we give you a document that is now filed again and again. you have to have a property certified and give us that information. you are
medications. the law requires that anyone even in involuntary commit a person the right to refuse psychiatric medication in a non-emergency situation unless there is a judicial find that go this person lacks the capacity or ability to make rational decisions regarding his or her medical treatment. in further response to the need for make sure that treatment is provided and people with psychiatric disability have access to trees and maintain stability in the community, san francisco in 2011, we started a pilot project and that pilot project is called independence in the community, pilot project. it's cipp. this is a collaboration among department of public health, office of the public conservator, san francisco district attorney as counsel for the public conservator and the superior court of san francisco and office of the public defender. the key feature of this program is to have someone who has starting a serial hospitalization and the provider identifies this person and receives this person to this program. the program is voluntary. the person agrees not to refuse medication. t
if you're in law enforce. you're probably going to want to write this down. no graph.net. randy campbell has been working in graffiti cases forever and he's a retired, i think, sheriff or highway patrolman. maybe somebody can help me out there. >> highway patrol. >> highway patrolman. what he runs it's no ground.net. for law enforcement, if you're looking for a tagger you think is crossing state boundaries and you catch one and you want to put up that person's tag to other law enforcement agencies, he's got a network where you can do that. so, you send that in to him, he sends it out and it goes to hundreds of cities. if you're looking for somebody and you think that other cities might know who that is, put that out and he'll send it out to all those cities. so, e-mail him and get on his network. he's got a website. and he's a great resource for law enforcement specifically and everybody else, too, but law enforcement specifically to help you find graffiti vandals or to add on to cases if you do find a graffiti vandal. so, this is for randy campbell. thanks. (applause) >> good news. rebe
's law to help the seriously mentally ill we see on the streets. these folks are a danger to themselves and others and we must work with the system and put them on the pact through case management and monitoring. for two years now since i've been mayor we call this initiative for the community and it's working. this is helping people chief greater stability so this year we'll make the san francisco law calls laura's law pertinent. it's about public safety arrest despite a year where we experiences to homicides in our city san francisco remains the safest city at levels not seen since the 1960s. one homicide is too many. last year, i i was frustrated like all of you by the rash the homicides and shootings in this very community and i suggested we need to shack up our efforts for the police and communities to stop this voinsz. i regret the upheaval it started but i don't regret this today. since we launched the ipo we've seen some rules no homicides in august since the last thirty years. and homicides and gun violence down over the first part of the year citywide. thank you to
against this. the law makers will not pass them. i'm losing faith in our democracy. congress is letting down these laws. we voted for prop 15 and if it passed today it would pass with more votes. this action correlated with the building boom and any capitalism in san francisco. a city that could not have been made great without working class people. there are no winners here in this legislation. now, earlier i heard about hospitals needing more beds because it seems like they are planning on people being more sick and with the medications they give to people. my mother lost her memory due to statin drugs. i grew up reading herb cane and solving chest problems. i know they has changed for the worst. i have been here since i was born. the dispensary has improved my life. the drug laws killed my father. anyway. >> good afternoon, commissioners, my name is angie. i'm 26 plus year resident of the excels district. i'm with the active group which is a volunteer driven community base non-profit organization. we focus on the mission street corridor between silver and again via. we support the l
of learning cross-examination skills and of learning the law. what we do is teach lawyers to adopt values that are missing in the system. we give them strategies when they confront challenges in the system to overcome those challenges instilling values in them and we have a membership community that reinforces to try to do that and the goal is when they are raiseing the standard of interpretation. in 10 years one of them will be sitting at that table, one of them will get that question an they will answer it correctly. i don't have enough resources. the movement is about teaching people to be better lawyers today but also building an army of people across the region and ultimately across the country who will work their ways into positions of power where they are leading public defenders offices and hiring people behind them to do what you do all the time, jeff, you are out there telling people that public defenders matter. [ applause ] >> believe me, it's always a struggle. i see my budget analyst telling me right here. you talk about reaching policy makers and politician and elected offi
3 strikes law. i also want to point out to this group even though the focus today is on public defenders in the criminal system, in san francisco we try to go even further than that. last year they were making san francisco the rights to civil council city, the city of gideon. there are civil cases, eviction cases, family law cases where the consequences, the results followed in court are almost as severe to what gideon faced and what people face in criminal cases. what we recognize at the outset of the supervisors proclamation is part inspirational, our leaders in the community have rallied around it and the bar association and our firms have taken on more conviction cases. later we'll be holding an event to thank people in these positions and so please stay tuned about that. in the meantime let's focus on gideon and the public defenders role. i would say if there is ever a time and place to turn the tied and to bring the &m music back to gideon's trumpet. we thank you and look forward to a great day. thank you. [ applause ] >> about a year-and-a-half go we saw one of the mo
and in fact there is law on this particular issue as pointed out in the reply statement. the law never requires impossibilities. that's a code from civil code section 3531. no man is responsible for that which no man can control. that's civil code section 3526. and no one can take advantage of his own wrong or in this case her own wrong, civil code section 3517. this is the law of the state of california. and the department is ignoring it. this board does not have that luxury. >> before we go on to the department rebuttal, i want to focus that we are here to talk about the paint chips that landed on the adjacent property and that's what the violation was about, right? >> no. that's not what it's about. the condition is on dr. engelberg's property and that's the wall. >> that's not what we are hearing? >> if you look at the report, it was reiterated a few moments ago. you look at page 2 of the department's report, the very first paragraph says -- excuse me, inspect or can speak to that. >> the gist of the first paragraph on page 2 is that we are not talking about lead abatement or lead
never do that or couldn't do that because of the laws in my political jurisdiction or whatever, we are not allowed to do that. then there's going to be other things when you think, gosh, i never thought about that, i think that would work really good. i'm going to take it back it my jurisdiction. probably over the past few years i've got 500 people i've dealt with, officers that have come to the class and subsequently become gravanis experts and set up programs. almost every program is different. a lot of the basis is the same, the information is consistent worldwide but people will tweak what information they are going to use and how they are going to be allowed to operate. some are in plain cars, some in marked units, it all depends how it's going to go. take the information you get, there's so much good information here today and tomorrow, take the information you want, take it back and integrate it into however you are going to work your program. when we come right down to it, it's not important what you know, it's what you can prove in court. probably every officer sittin
. we have to work with the pretrial system and law enforcement and judicial system, we are a part of it and i see we will be a part of it for years. >> we got a second question, i am going to ask it. if someone qualifies for release isn't inherently unfair that this person remains incarcerated because of the inability to post bail. i guess if someone qualifies for release, they don't have to post bail. are there instances where someone -- let me ask it differently. i have been in court where a judge charged them with a crime and could see a release. but maybe other issues going on. maybe barefooted and don't have a place they are living. and maybe get someone like you willie, in your organization involved and supervisor. is that appropriate? or is that violating someone's right not to have the oversight of the court and criminal justice system? will? >> how supervisor retrial came about was really in jail overcrowding. there are cases where, specific cases, getting a homeless individual. there are a group of case managers called court accountable homeless services. it targets home
really act as a good communicator and facilitator in the program from a law enforcement background. and the grant we get through public works really allows us to run effectively. >> great, thank you. >> [speaker not understood]. let me come on over here. what's your question? >> okay. [speaker not understood]. i've gotten three years of knowledge [speaker not understood]. my question is this. how am i going to get the police department, how am i going to get city council -- they're partially on board, but some of our people in public works are here today. how can i convey to them that i'm not a nut -- everybody here thinks i'm a nut because [speaker not understood]. how did they really take this seriously and realize that graffiti is a crime and it requires money and it requires attention from the officials, not just from covering graffiti? is there an answer? can you give me some sort of -- what's a good direction? >> [speaker not understood]. >> [speaker not understood]. basically the task force, they'll put together and try to convince the citizens something is happening, then i
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
and police officers, law enforcement. i'm curious what role law enforcement can play in restoretive justice, what can be imparted as groups of people who may or may not be connected with the trauma. once you are traumatized by the school, politicians, et cetera, et cetera, then you have more of these power dynamic things going on in your head, i'm going to exert whatever power i have on these people, i'm interested in hearing about the restoretive power that we want to be part of the change. >> our organization just had a grant to partner with the department of justice to make films on exactly those kinds of things. we're going to be making a film on working with school resource officers and how to work with students. we don't believe we should even call anyone a bully because once you get labeled it stays with you. i've gotten letters saying there's a bully in my kid's first grade. the statistics show that about a third of the kids are bullied and bully others. as one kid said, i wanted to man up and show i wasn't going to be bullied so i did it to anyone else. breaking that cycle is g
filings that pg&e has made. they made a filing in compliance with state requirement, state law and regulation on march 31st, and that is the filing to comply with ab 97 0, the community choice aggregation cold of conduct they needed to identify by march 31st whether they were going to establish an independent marketing entity to oppose community choice aggregation efforts within their service territory. we did file a protest in response to the filing and are asking that the filing be rejected by the california public utilities commission and that pg&e should be prohibited from marketing against cca's unless and until they meet the requirements of the code of conduct. in our reading of what they filed, they were told that they must decide by march 31st whether they want to have the option to market against community choice aggregation programs and how they will train their staff and educate their staff and establish procedures to make sure that they perform that marketing consistent with the law. they didn't say yes they were and they didn't say no they weren't. they gave an und
with the schools and law enforcement, with probation, our office, with public centers office and looking a sulsystem's approach and not just punitive base but there are going to be consequences as nancy said for very extreme acts but everything ultimately is local. i mean with limited exceptions of people that need lifelong time outs or much longer than everybody else, but by in large everything is local and i think that we really put a lot of focus on our young people. my colleagues and the superintendent was here barbara and had to leave about an hour ago and we try to work together. we have been trying to be innovative in truancy areas. i think i stole this from alameda and san francisco but i sent a letter out to address all school parents on my letterhead to talk about the importance of kids being in school and sort of the having the feather in the club approach but basically talking statistically today's victims being tomorrow's victims and perpetrators and how important it is for your kids to be in school, so it's the full community approach and the holistic approach as it were
in the bail reform act of 1984, the federal law, the birth of preventative detention which one thought was clearly unconstitutional and then became a public good that changed the whole view of a system. now we live in a justice preemptive justice, but they will commit other crimes in the future. i would say if we all now agree or at least many of us agree with justice kennedy that the result has been a prison system that is barbaric that doesn't belong in a civilized society and serious atonement and i think you would recognize in the california prisons to meet that. let me say why it's a risk. it's always so reasonable to see risk as a way on out of these. i don't think i need to remind those in the room that an entire population were incarcerated for risk. nobody was held accountable for it either. if you look at the way this is a risk, you see racial class is at the end of the day the right kind of community ties and is risk reduction. professor simon, let me ask a follow-up. i want to get an idea of what a system you are advocating would look like. let's say you have arraignment f
seen too much violence in our communities and it must end. yesterday i signed into law the nation's first ban on possession of halopoint ammunition in san francisco. we worked closely with supervisor cohen to introduce this legislation. these extra deadly bullets have no place in our streets. we are also creating an early warning system to alert us when individuals make massive purchases of ammunition, because even if there is a remote possibility we can prevent another tragedy, we are morally bound to do so. and we must support president obama and senator finestien comprehensive effort to reform the gun laws, i support state and federal effort to keep the weapons off of our streets and out of our homes. i have directed our city agencies and law enforcement officials to move towards plans of action, to prioritize and create solutions that impact policy changes and take aggressive actions against the moment egregious types of gun violence and we are working hard and making more plans for more deeper, more wider gun buy back programs and events that will take place later this year.
today. we have experts from law enforcement. we have experts from committed to groups. we have people from all around the country, all around the world that will be here to share many of those ideas. i know at the end of the conference everyone will leave feeling more empowered. you will learn ideas that you can go back and share in your communities. also today we will be having a press conference at around 11:30 also. and the press conference is i think one that will focus on many of the areas that we struggle. in san francisco we struggle a lot in the courthouses in terms of how to deal with vandals. sometimes in many cases they get community service. as you heard me say earlier it is the same people who are coming through 3, 4, 5 times and still doing community service. will be pushing for stiffer fines; will work closer with the judges. graffiti is a quality-of-life issue. it used to be low on the totem pole. in san francisco it is the second highest number of calls we get in terms of quality of life. the first being street cleaning issues and garbage. graffiti is now second.
would estimate, after 16 years as an administrative law judge, that would be -- the soonest there would be a decision would be three months, i'm guessing because the puc, the california puc's own procedural requirements can be much longer. >> so, can you present to us the next step, hopefully before our last meeting, a scenario that is going to assume a $6 rate for pg&e and where we can be in striking distance? i think that -- hate to even say it, a local buildout is such a priority that i think the rec -- the bundling piece should probably be a lesser of a priority. but i would want to see, you know, a plan from when we could increase the quality of the rec mix of the bundling. >> the rec mix. >> and that is required by state law. we'll be increasing it over the coming years whether we want to or not. >> right. i think that's right, and i also think the value add you get from getting the local buildout going and the money generated and jobs generated really outweigh a lot of this. that should be our focus as long as we can still make the price competitive. >> okay. >> so, maybe what we
's companies opening up on a monthly basis par there's a taxi cab company by law i don't know what the real rules are you haven't looked into that. if you see a claim you control the taxi business you look at this company their telling us they're using limousines and taxis and other vehicles for this business. every year you've raised our fees and i believe you want to suck 25 million a year out of the taxi business. we don't have a dental plan or pension or anything. i don't know when you're going to start implementing it but we need a pension and a medical plan and a minimum wage to at least match what muni drivers are making. maybe taxi drivers don't deserve is a get paid a better wage. we're part of the city and county of san francisco we should have the same wage as the minnesota drivers. thank you. >> (calling names). >> good afternoon berry. i first want to say that the t m y vehicles are going to be a dinosaur. so i think you'd better look at the fuel tanks because it's tough to fill up. i went to a night club which has a new sound system i was about ready to go home and some guy
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
them safe and also we let the police -- law enforcement know this program is happening and when it's happening so that they're hypersensitive to it. >> i'm going to go back over here and we have a couple comments. i think we're going to stick with this topic a little bit because it looks like there's a lot of interest. i'll get back to you after this gentleman back here. and i'll hold the mic and you just speak into it, okay, sir. let me get on this side of it and go ahead. >> don't wait until somebody gets assaulted like i did. make sure you're proactive about that issue. since i was jumped in june, what we do is a recon so we know where all the gang tags are because they're a problem. so, i make out a list. i draw out a map. i know how to hit them in 45 minutes or less. i want my officers back out on the street. i don't want them baby-sitting me. but i never go in alone again. i carry some protection. i get a three-vehicle escort. our police department is all behind this. i use magnetic signs on my vehicle now and i always wear a safety vest. never go alone. we set up five differ
and can be so insidious behind closed doors. the governor signed a bill into law and my office and the l.a. county sheriff have committed to keeping track and data of crimes that occur involving the internet or social media because we frankly don't have good data around that, particularly involved with crime so for the next couple of years we do will a lot of data collection and working with law enforcement and they're doing it and address this problem from evidence and outcome based area. thank you. >> thank you. >> no name other than more work for nance's staff. -- >> what we do in oakland -- i don't think bullying is more than a school issue. this is bully center thed. there is a way the violence perm mates across the board and i strongly believe that schools are the heart of health and community well being and the way we're going to transform this world is coming around our kids. we have a sacred obligation and kids to be safe and well connected and well known is all of us, all of us, all the time and even in the room today and the pretense and around the punter -- the question
of these regulations that are in our sf law was recommended by patients and operators so they can be responsibly integrated into our communities. right know we have a green zone in san francisco and we can't even access all of the green zone in san francisco. there are neighborhoods that it's so hostile that neighbors do not want this used so bad that they will appeal every single permit, building and planning and make it impossible to open up in. in areas that we do have green zone left, we are seeing people opening up in areas where it's not hostile. being honest in district 6 where we see a lot of medical dispensaries operating side by side, it's not an issue. it's helped the neighborhood, created more of a safe environment. i have not felt better walking down mission and 6 street because of the prevalence of the medical cannabis in that community. i ask you to please reject these restrictions. it's the wrong venue. this commission as well as any other body repeated with our policy makers go back to the drawing board. >> you are out of your time. >> sorry. i will write a letter. any other spe
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